HomeInternationalInfrastructure in the Amazon must work with the communities and thinking of...

Infrastructure in the Amazon must work with the communities and thinking of their people

- Advertisment -

Infrastructure in the Amazon must work with the communities and thinking of their people

The development of road infrastructure in the Amazon should consider a joint work with indigenous communities to collect the necessary information for the correct design and execution of investment projects. This is one of the conclusions reached by the virtual seminar “Infrastructure from the people: What a study tells us about local needs and capacities for a sustainable infrastructure”, Organized by the Civil Association DAR and INTE PUCP.

At this event, Ciro Salazar, specialist of the Environmental Governance and Management program of the DAR Civil Association, presented the study on local needs and capacities on the experience of native communities in the area of ​​influence of the Iquitos – Saramiriza highway, in Loreto[1], result of the joint work carried out with the indigenous organizations ORPIO and CORPI.

The visit to 21 indigenous communities in the basins of the Tigre and Morona rivers allowed determining that, although there is a gap in access to quality public services in the place, there are also several indicators that point to an ongoing degradation of the forest of the which communities depend on to survive.

“This implies an increase in the economic vulnerability of these populations. Identifying the living space of communities is key when designing and evaluating project impacts. There are also risks to public health and illicit activities that must be evaluated. Not to rule out projects necessarily, but to set necessary safeguards at the right time, “he stressed.

The study reveals that 93% of households have agriculture as their main activity, while 80% are dedicated to fishing and 70% to hunting. Likewise, half of the interviewed families sell agricultural products in district or regional markets.

“When we ask where families go for emergencies, 89% go to medical posts. However, more than a third also use healers and plants. It was possible to identify 82 types of medicinal plants of frequent use in total among the areas visited in the Tigre and Morona basins. This gives us an idea of ​​the diversity in the place, and the importance of forest conservation from a public health point of view ”, explains Salazar.

Deborah Delgado, a PUCP researcher, who was also involved in the study, considered it necessary to highlight that infrastructure needs to be coordinated with territorial planning. “This is missing us a lot. If it does not come from the people, it becomes a role that has a negative function. It has an effect, but it can go against its objectives (…). The moment in which we live allows us to start from various consensuses ”, he said.

Likewise, Rubén Medina, a specialist from the indigenous organization ORPIO -which together with CORPI-SL and DAR participated in the information gathering work-, highlighted the risks of road projects for the rights of the communities.

“Currently we have a highway that will pass through the territories of native communities that are 20 minutes from Iquitos. This creates greater pressure on the territories of the indigenous communities, which are often not physically and legally healthy, and the opening of these roads helps to increase the presence of illegal activities. And they are not being consulted, so we are working to create consultation protocols from indigenous peoples to strengthen this right, “he said.

Along these lines, Ángel Sosa, environmental specialist at Provías Descentralizado, commented that “Information is key. Without it, there is little we can do. The Iquitos – Saramiriza project is assumed by Provías on behalf of the Loreto regional government. Today it is paralyzed because we have to act based on compliance with given laws. The consortium hired to prepare the Profile has not been able to enter to collect primary information. This information that DAR presents today is what is needed and that must be generated by the State ”.

The experience of Colombia

The webinar also featured the participation of Maryi Serrano, a member of the Foundation for Conservation and Sustainable Development (FCDS), who recounted the Colombian experience for the development of green infrastructure projects. “Colombia started with the issue of green infrastructure due to international commitments such as adherence to the OECD and the goals for reducing greenhouse gases. In this framework, in 2013 the Interministerial Environmental Agenda was implemented, with the purpose of seeking an adequate articulation of environmental issues in the planning of the Transportation sector ”.

Likewise, he clarified that although the green infrastructure guidelines are not binding, the institutions in Colombia seek to have them incorporated into the design of infrastructure projects.

In turn, Mónica Núñez, a member of the Environmental Management Clinic of the Universidad del Pacífico, considered it necessary to learn from the Colombian experience. “In Peru, a mechanism of functional systems has been chosen, in which the articulation between the sectors is greatly weakened. The way in which we have designed these institutions ends up weakening the institutionality ”, he specified.


[1] Study authored by Ciro Salazar, María Sembrero and Jessica Florián, from DAR, based on the joint work of collecting information with the indigenous organizations ORPIO and CORPI-SL.

in details

The development of road infrastructure in the Amazon should consider a joint work with indigenous communities to collect the necessary information for the correct design and execution of investment projects. This is one of the conclusions reached by the virtual seminar “Infrastructure from the people: What a study tells us about local needs and capacities for a sustainable infrastructure”, Organized by the Civil Association DAR and INTE PUCP.

At this event, Ciro Salazar, specialist of the Environmental Governance and Management program of the DAR Civil Association, presented the study on local needs and capacities on the experience of native communities in the area of ​​influence of the Iquitos – Saramiriza highway, in Loreto[1], result of the joint work carried out with the indigenous organizations ORPIO and CORPI.

The visit to 21 indigenous communities in the basins of the Tigre and Morona rivers allowed determining that, although there is a gap in access to quality public services in the place, there are also several indicators that point to an ongoing degradation of the forest of the which communities depend on to survive.

“This implies an increase in the economic vulnerability of these populations. Identifying the living space of communities is key when designing and evaluating project impacts. There are also risks to public health and illicit activities that must be evaluated. Not to rule out projects necessarily, but to set necessary safeguards at the right time, “he stressed.

The study reveals that 93% of households have agriculture as their main activity, while 80% are dedicated to fishing and 70% to hunting. Likewise, half of the interviewed families sell agricultural products in district or regional markets.

“When we ask where families go for emergencies, 89% go to medical posts. However, more than a third also use healers and plants. It was possible to identify 82 types of medicinal plants of frequent use in total among the areas visited in the Tigre and Morona basins. This gives us an idea of ​​the diversity in the place, and the importance of forest conservation from a public health point of view ”, explains Salazar.

Deborah Delgado, a PUCP researcher, who was also involved in the study, considered it necessary to highlight that infrastructure needs to be coordinated with territorial planning. “This is missing us a lot. If it does not come from the people, it becomes a role that has a negative function. It has an effect, but it can go against its objectives (…). The moment in which we live allows us to start from various consensuses ”, he said.

Likewise, Rubén Medina, a specialist from the indigenous organization ORPIO -which together with CORPI-SL and DAR participated in the information gathering work-, highlighted the risks of road projects for the rights of the communities.

“Currently we have a highway that will pass through the territories of native communities that are 20 minutes from Iquitos. This creates greater pressure on the territories of the indigenous communities, which are often not physically and legally healthy, and the opening of these roads helps to increase the presence of illegal activities. And they are not being consulted, so we are working to create consultation protocols from indigenous peoples to strengthen this right, “he said.

Along these lines, Ángel Sosa, environmental specialist at Provías Descentralizado, commented that “Information is key. Without it, there is little we can do. The Iquitos – Saramiriza project is assumed by Provías on behalf of the Loreto regional government. Today it is paralyzed because we have to act based on compliance with given laws. The consortium hired to prepare the Profile has not been able to enter to collect primary information. This information that DAR presents today is what is needed and that must be generated by the State ”.

The experience of Colombia

The webinar also featured the participation of Maryi Serrano, a member of the Foundation for Conservation and Sustainable Development (FCDS), who recounted the Colombian experience for the development of green infrastructure projects. “Colombia started with the issue of green infrastructure due to international commitments such as adherence to the OECD and the goals for reducing greenhouse gases. In this framework, in 2013 the Interministerial Environmental Agenda was implemented, with the purpose of seeking an adequate articulation of environmental issues in the planning of the Transportation sector ”.

Likewise, he clarified that although the green infrastructure guidelines are not binding, the institutions in Colombia seek to have them incorporated into the design of infrastructure projects.

In turn, Mónica Núñez, a member of the Environmental Management Clinic of the Universidad del Pacífico, considered it necessary to learn from the Colombian experience. “In Peru, a mechanism of functional systems has been chosen, in which the articulation between the sectors is greatly weakened. The way in which we have designed these institutions ends up weakening the institutionality ”, he specified.


[1] Study authored by Ciro Salazar, María Sembrero and Jessica Florián, from DAR, based on the joint work of collecting information with the indigenous organizations ORPIO and CORPI-SL.

, for more latest world update’s, scroll down page
#Infrastructure #Amazon #work #communities #thinking #people

- Advertisment -

Most Popular

- Advertisment -

Recent Comments