Reporter’s Notebook: When Margaret Thatcher and Mikhail Gorbachev Gathered to Honor President Reagan | Pro IQRA News

Pro IQRA News Updates.

the newYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

Editor’s note: This story first aired on Fox News on April 9, 2013, but was republished after Tuesday’s announcement Mikhail Gorbachev dies.

The calendar was read in June 2004. But it was definitely the 80s.

Three of the world’s most eminent leaders from the last days of the Cold War have come together for the last time. Icons, indelible from the cultural fabric of the decade like “The Cosby Show” and “Family Ties” back-to-back on Thursday nights, cult films like “Heathers” and “The Breakfast Club,” and old films of women clamoring for “Where’s the beef?”

But this wasn’t like a rock band hitting the road on a reunion tour. He explained that flag-covered casket surrounded by a guard of honor is in the middle of the Capitol Rotunda.

This was goodbye.

Gorbachev’s translator reacts to the Russia-Ukraine crisis, the escalation in tension since the end of the Cold War

FILE - Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, left, former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney attend a state funeral for former US President Ronald Reagan at Washington National Cathedral in Washington, DC.

FILE – Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, left, former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney attend a state funeral for former US President Ronald Reagan at Washington National Cathedral in Washington, DC.
(Reuters/Kevin Lamarck)

They were visiting their friend for the last time in an instant. But for now, wait.

They were part of a row of people who stood in the hall between the Rotunda and the Old Senate Chamber. The men were wearing black suits. Women, dark dresses.

But this duo stood out among other mourners.

For him, there was the vascular birthmark, the wine birthmark.

And for her, there was the wallet.

The money bag.

Other times, the bag might dangle from her left forearm as she waves to the crowd or the paparazzi.

But on this day, she held it close to her body like a bag full of diamonds.

US President Ronald Reagan, left, and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev leave Hovey House after completing two days of talks during a mini-summit in Reykjavik, Iceland, on October 12, 1986.

US President Ronald Reagan, left, and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev leave Hovey House after completing two days of talks during a mini-summit in Reykjavik, Iceland, on October 12, 1986.
(Reuters/Nick Didlick)

Amid the grumbling, no one thought much of it. But this was the eighties. And here you had Mikhail Gorbachev, the former Secretary General of the USSR, and the Right Honorable Baroness Margaret Thatcher, the former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland …

To bid farewell to Ronald Wilson Reagan, the 40th President of the United States.

Gorbachev moved to the Rotunda and patted the coffin of the man who declared his nation an “evil empire.”

Reagan’s ‘Tear in This Wall’ speech still teaches how to confront Russia

Reagan and Gorbachev were prominent figures in the 1980s as leaders of the world’s only superpowers. But it was Thatcher who brought them together.

It was Thatcher who first met Gorbachev upon his ascent to the Kremlin. “I love Mr. Gorbachev,” Thatcher said. “We can do business together.” Such an iron-clad endorsement of the Iron Lady went a long way with Reagan. This led to arms summits in Geneva and even the failure of a set of talks in Reykjavik, Iceland. Some argue that Reykjavik was ultimately successful – because both sides learned how close they came to a treaty.

It was Gorbachev—and his station in life at the helm of the Kremlin—that brought Thatcher and Reagan together: united in their contempt for communism.

And it was Reagan’s death that brought them together under the dome of the Capitol on this sombre occasion. Thatcher stood quietly in the Capitol aisle, waiting to pay her respects to her friend. As for Reagan, he trusted her as much as any other foreign leader. I approached Reagan’s coffin in the rotunda on purpose—and with some help. Ruby red lipstick and a single strand of thick pearls stood out against her black ensemble. Thatcher gently extended her hand, and stroked her right palm across the American flag that covered Reagan’s coffin as if she was petting an animal.

The other mourners looked around the rotunda. They spoke in a calm tone. They painted their eyes with Kleenex.

Reagan’s coffin never left Thatcher’s steely gaze.

US President Ronald Reagan, center, and his wife, Nancy, listen to Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev speaking at the White House on December 10, 1987.

US President Ronald Reagan, center, and his wife, Nancy, listen to Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev speaking at the White House on December 10, 1987.
(Reuters/Gary Hirschhorn)

In February 1985, Thatcher’s embrace of Reagan appeared during her speech at a joint session of Congress. At the time, Thatcher became the first British Prime Minister to address the House and Senate since Winston Churchill in 1952.

She praised Reagan’s approach to Gorbachev, saying he “brought the Soviet Union to the negotiating table in Geneva.” Thatcher also stood behind Reagan’s plan for a missile defense system in space to protect against any Soviet attack, much to the delight of Republican lawmakers. The missile system’s official name was the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). But the late Senator Ted Kennedy, D-Mass., dubbed it “Star Wars” for its seemingly science-fiction concepts of shooting lasers into outer space.

With the outbreak of war in Ukraine, Reagan’s historic mission to Russia took lessons for us today

An economic conservative, Thatcher infuriated Labor with her budget cuts and social service reforms — not to mention bands like Pink Floyd and The Clash with whom she took her grievances straight to Fennell. Thatcher used the occasion on Capitol Hill to appeal to Washington to harness the spending.

“We strongly support your efforts to reduce your budget deficit,” Thatcher said. “No other country in the world can be immune to its effects – like the impact of the American economy on all of us.”

The message still resonates today as lawmakers grapple with out-of-control spending and blunt spending mechanisms like confinement.

Statue of Ronald Reagan in the US Capitol Building.

Statue of Ronald Reagan in the US Capitol Building.
(Chad Bergram/Fox News)

But in her Congressional presentation, Thatcher saved her praise for Reagan, speaking just days after his second inauguration (also held in the Capitol Rotunda due to the bitter cold of 1985).

“There is a new mood in the United States,” Thatcher told lawmakers. “The visitor feels it at once. The return of your patriotic pride is almost palpable. Now the sun rises in the West.”

Thatcher went on to declare that her speech before the joint session of Congress was “one of the most touching occasions in my life.”

This week, the House of Representatives returned the favor, by approving a resolution honoring Thatcher “for her lifelong commitment to advancing liberty, liberty, and democracy, and for her friendship with the United States of America.”

Putin Sadelenis Russia’s Defense Minister due to stalled progress in Ukraine, says UK

When House finished for the night, it was postponed in honor of Thatcher—the same gesture he made to Winston Churchill when he passed away in 1965.

Then-House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) called Thatcher “the greatest peacetime prime minister in British history”.

Mikhail Gorbachev and Chad Bergram

Mikhail Gorbachev and Chad Bergram
(Chad Bergram)

Then-House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, praised Thatcher for her “steadfast hand in our battle to win the Cold War, helping bring down the Berlin Wall, brick by brick.”

Perhaps these feelings are just appropriate.

In the Capitol stands a statue of Reagan. The base is lined with shards of the Berlin Wall—forever linked to Bregan’s 1987 advice “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall.”

Reagan’s streak is undoubtedly one of the most important moments of the decade.

So among those troikas of the 1980s, only one remained: Gorbachev, who lived after both the Soviet regime and his fellow leaders.

CLICK HERE FOR FOX NEWS APP

The 1980s are long gone. It was reduced to the Sirius/XM channel running Duran Duran and The Thompson Twins. Or you can re-spy “St. Elmo’s Fire” on the cable.

But politically speaking, they floated the definitive playlist in the 1980s in the early 2000s when the trio bid farewell to each other under the dome of the Capitol.

.

RELATED ARTICLES
- Advertisment -

Latest News & Updates

- Advertisment -