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Study “Girls in crisis” / “Venezuelan Girls: Voices of migration” 3 out of 10 Venezuelan migrant girls in Peru, Colombia and Ecuador are not studying

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Study “Girls in crisis” / “Venezuelan Girls: Voices of migration” 3 out of 10 Venezuelan migrant girls in Peru, Colombia and Ecuador are not studying

Peru, November 2021.- Within the framework of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, Plan International presents the study “Girls in crisis” / “Venezuelan Girls: Voices of migration”, covering above all the issues of gender violence, education and health.
The results in terms of education reflected that 28% of the girls and adolescents surveyed indicated that they were not studying.

The main barriers to accessing education -in Venezuelan refugee and migrant girls and adolescents- are related to the difficulty of obtaining a place in educational institutions (20%), the lack of documentation to validate and certify their studies or to formalize enrollment ( 20%) and having dependent sons and daughters (15%).

Regarding school permanence, a significant number of Venezuelan refugee and migrant adolescents surveyed identify that, even when there are more Venezuelan girls and adolescents integrated into the education systems of Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, gender discrimination is stagnant in the culture of these countries has a negative impact on the recognition of their school performance, a situation that affects their commitment and motivation for their training processes.

If we talk about health, 40% of Venezuelan girls and adolescents have required health services, but could not access them. The vast majority are subjected to child labor, exposing them to risks such as accidents, injuries and illnesses. As it is irregular or illegal work, they are excluded from access to health services and social protection.

Another relevant indicator is that 19% of the total study participants – over 15 years old – stated that they were or had faced early pregnancies, and that 10% of the girls and adolescents reported living or having lived with someone in a relationship intimate partner.

We cannot ignore the results on gender-based violence, the most recurrent form of violence that affects Venezuelan refugee and migrant girls and adolescents in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. 50% of migrant or refugee girls and adolescents have reported feeling unsafe on the streets.

21% of the participants have witnessed situations of violence or abuse. In this sense, 13% of them have witnessed verbal attacks against other girls and adolescents. What the girls and adolescents consulted indicate is that they tend to witness and star in cases of sexual, physical and psychological violence and experience xenophobia in public spaces and social networks.

“For us and we it is important to monitor and know the reality of girls, boys and women in Peru and the world, to know what are the problems that most afflict and how the social situation is evolving in vulnerability. In this way we will know where and with whom we should work ”, says Veronique Henry, Country Director of Plan International Peru.

Henry also comments that the aforementioned results reflect that there is still much to be done to reduce the high levels of violence and discrimination that exist against migrant girls and adolescents. And this gap can be narrowed with the support of each citizen.
To learn more about Plan International Peru, you can enter the following link: https://www.planinternational.org.pe/

in details

Peru, November 2021.- Within the framework of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, Plan International presents the study “Girls in crisis” / “Venezuelan Girls: Voices of migration”, covering above all the issues of gender violence, education and health.
The results in terms of education reflected that 28% of the girls and adolescents surveyed indicated that they were not studying.

The main barriers to accessing education -in Venezuelan refugee and migrant girls and adolescents- are related to the difficulty of obtaining a place in educational institutions (20%), the lack of documentation to validate and certify their studies or to formalize enrollment ( 20%) and having dependent sons and daughters (15%).

Regarding school permanence, a significant number of Venezuelan refugee and migrant adolescents surveyed identify that, even when there are more Venezuelan girls and adolescents integrated into the education systems of Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, gender discrimination is stagnant in the culture of these countries has a negative impact on the recognition of their school performance, a situation that affects their commitment and motivation for their training processes.

If we talk about health, 40% of Venezuelan girls and adolescents have required health services, but could not access them. The vast majority are subjected to child labor, exposing them to risks such as accidents, injuries and illnesses. As it is irregular or illegal work, they are excluded from access to health services and social protection.

Another relevant indicator is that 19% of the total study participants – over 15 years old – stated that they were or had faced early pregnancies, and that 10% of the girls and adolescents reported living or having lived with someone in a relationship intimate partner.

We cannot ignore the results on gender-based violence, the most recurrent form of violence that affects Venezuelan refugee and migrant girls and adolescents in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. 50% of migrant or refugee girls and adolescents have reported feeling unsafe on the streets.

21% of the participants have witnessed situations of violence or abuse. In this sense, 13% of them have witnessed verbal attacks against other girls and adolescents. What the girls and adolescents consulted indicate is that they tend to witness and star in cases of sexual, physical and psychological violence and experience xenophobia in public spaces and social networks.

“For us and we it is important to monitor and know the reality of girls, boys and women in Peru and the world, to know what are the problems that most afflict and how the social situation is evolving in vulnerability. In this way we will know where and with whom we should work ”, says Veronique Henry, Country Director of Plan International Peru.

Henry also comments that the aforementioned results reflect that there is still much to be done to reduce the high levels of violence and discrimination that exist against migrant girls and adolescents. And this gap can be narrowed with the support of each citizen.
To learn more about Plan International Peru, you can enter the following link: https://www.planinternational.org.pe/

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