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The case of the demonstrators killed sharpens the resolve of the protesters against the army in Sudan

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The case of the demonstrators killed sharpens the resolve of the protesters against the army in Sudan

KHARTOUM: Mohamed Abdel Salam was planning to help his 18-year-old son Mido immigrate from Sudan to Saudi Arabia. But Mido died after a bullet lodged in the chest in protest of the army’s takeover of power on October 25.
In a phrase dripping with bitterness, Abd al-Salam says in his home in the modest Bahri neighborhood adjacent to the capital, Khartoum, “He was a defenseless young man in the prime of his life… He was my support.”
In the month following the army’s seizure of power in Sudan, security forces killed at least 42 people, according to medics supporting the protest movement.
Many of the victims were in their teens or twenties, the youngest of whom was Rimaz Hatem al-Atta, 13.
The Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors said that Rimaz was in front of her house when a bullet hit her head.
Army chief Abdel Fattah al-Burhan told the Financial Times this week that 10 deaths had been recorded during the protests, the circumstances of which are being investigated. He blamed the deaths on the police or armed political factions.
The police acknowledge the death of one protester and deny the use of live ammunition to target protesters. A spokesperson for her could not be reached for comment.
The case casts a shadow over an agreement concluded this week that led to the return of ousted Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok to power, and fanned the flames of anger against the security forces.
Protest organizers vowed to escalate until the army is completely removed from power, rejecting the agreement to restore Hamdok.
New protests erupted today, Thursday, with the phrase “loyalty to the martyrs” as a slogan, referring not only to the post-coup deaths, but also to the dozens of demonstrators who died in the uprising that toppled former President Omar al-Bashir in 2019.
This week’s agreement stipulates that Hamdok will head a government of technocrats in a phase of political transition, and an investigation into deaths among the security forces and civilians. But it did not include any reference to a previous commitment in 2019 that the army chief hand over the presidency of the Sovereignty Council to a civilian figure before the 2023 elections.
“Our youth are countries who died, they died for the sake of a democratic civilian government, and this agreement is rejected by the Sudanese people,” Abdel Salam said.

Unrestricted shooting

Witnesses and activists said that the crackdown on protests grew more violent in the days before the agreement with Hamdok.
The Bahri area, to the north of Khartoum on the other bank of the Nile, was the most affected.
Iman Anwar, Mido Abd al-Salam’s aunt, said that, as people flocked to the streets after hearing news of the coup, the neighborhood became besieged and covered in tear gas before the sounds of gunfire resounded in the area.
His funeral and that of others turned into protests, in which angry chants were mixed with cries of pain of separation.
November 17 was the bloodiest day of the protests, when paramedics recorded 16 deaths. Amnesty International said that at least nine of those killed on 13 and 17 November were shot in the head, neck or chest, at least one of them by a sniper, while 50 others were wounded by live ammunition.
Mazen, 33, from Bahri district, said that he was shot in the knee that day, and that he saw many others around him with severe injuries. “The police beat had no limit,” he said.
For her part, his mother, Tahani Amer, said that the hospital was crowded with wounded people around her son. She added, “Girls of the age of flowers. And children have been born and younger than him are infected.”
She explained, “The blood is in the ground, and the hospital is not able to provide complete first aid because the pressure on it is great, so it was a very difficult need. I was hoping that she would imagine and come down so that people would see what happened.”
(Reuters)

in details

KHARTOUM: Mohamed Abdel Salam was planning to help his 18-year-old son Mido immigrate from Sudan to Saudi Arabia. But Mido died after a bullet lodged in the chest in protest of the army’s takeover of power on October 25.
In a phrase dripping with bitterness, Abd al-Salam says in his home in the modest Bahri neighborhood adjacent to the capital, Khartoum, “He was a defenseless young man in the prime of his life… He was my support.”
In the month following the army’s seizure of power in Sudan, security forces killed at least 42 people, according to medics supporting the protest movement.
Many of the victims were in their teens or twenties, the youngest of whom was Rimaz Hatem al-Atta, 13.
The Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors said that Rimaz was in front of her house when a bullet hit her head.
Army chief Abdel Fattah al-Burhan told the Financial Times this week that 10 deaths had been recorded during the protests, the circumstances of which are being investigated. He blamed the deaths on the police or armed political factions.
The police acknowledge the death of one protester and deny the use of live ammunition to target protesters. A spokesperson for her could not be reached for comment.
The case casts a shadow over an agreement concluded this week that led to the return of ousted Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok to power, and fanned the flames of anger against the security forces.
Protest organizers vowed to escalate until the army is completely removed from power, rejecting the agreement to restore Hamdok.
New protests erupted today, Thursday, with the phrase “loyalty to the martyrs” as a slogan, referring not only to the post-coup deaths, but also to the dozens of demonstrators who died in the uprising that toppled former President Omar al-Bashir in 2019.
This week’s agreement stipulates that Hamdok will head a government of technocrats in a phase of political transition, and an investigation into deaths among the security forces and civilians. But it did not include any reference to a previous commitment in 2019 that the army chief hand over the presidency of the Sovereignty Council to a civilian figure before the 2023 elections.
“Our youth are countries who died, they died for the sake of a democratic civilian government, and this agreement is rejected by the Sudanese people,” Abdel Salam said.

Unrestricted shooting

Witnesses and activists said that the crackdown on protests grew more violent in the days before the agreement with Hamdok.
The Bahri area, to the north of Khartoum on the other bank of the Nile, was the most affected.
Iman Anwar, Mido Abd al-Salam’s aunt, said that, as people flocked to the streets after hearing news of the coup, the neighborhood became besieged and covered in tear gas before the sounds of gunfire resounded in the area.
His funeral and that of others turned into protests, in which angry chants were mixed with cries of pain of separation.
November 17 was the bloodiest day of the protests, when paramedics recorded 16 deaths. Amnesty International said that at least nine of those killed on 13 and 17 November were shot in the head, neck or chest, at least one of them by a sniper, while 50 others were wounded by live ammunition.
Mazen, 33, from Bahri district, said that he was shot in the knee that day, and that he saw many others around him with severe injuries. “The police beat had no limit,” he said.
For her part, his mother, Tahani Amer, said that the hospital was crowded with wounded people around her son. She added, “Girls of the age of flowers. And children have been born and younger than him are infected.”
She explained, “The blood is in the ground, and the hospital is not able to provide complete first aid because the pressure on it is great, so it was a very difficult need. I was hoping that she would imagine and come down so that people would see what happened.”
(Reuters)

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